News-sheet — Winter 2018–2019

I. EE Edition of Correspondence (2,040 letters)

This year’s update can be divided into two parts:

  1. a collection of women’s letters published here in celebration of the centenary of suffragette success in attaining the vote for women in Britain;
  2. other letters, including letters pertaining (primarily) to the theatre; a collection of early learned letters; and odd items of special interest.

Again, because the Electronic Enlightenment Scholarly Edition of Correspondence is always moving towards being the most complete collection of letters possible — for each and everyone of its correspondents — the current update continues to expand existing collections, such as the correspondence of the English actor, theatre owner, author and playwright David Garrick (born 1717–died 1779); to our existing collection of 113 Garrick letters, we’ve now added 49 more! — an increase of 43%.

A. Celebrating women (1,878 letters)

1. Graffigny, Françoise de (1st tranche: 1,216 letters of some 2,500)

2. Saint-Pierre, Catherine Dorothée de (140 letters & 140 translations)

3. Herschel, Caroline (194 letters)

4. Austen, Jane (158 letters)

5. Montagu, Elizabeth (29 letters)

6. Carter, Elizabeth (1 letter)

B. Other content (162 letters)

1. Murphy, Arthur (1st tranche: 110 letters of some 200)

2. Erasmus of Rotterdam (1st tranche: 36 letters of some 825)

3. Voltaire (4 letters in translation)

4. Voltaire — “new” letters (3 letters)

5. Secondat, Charles Louis de, baron de Montesquieu (3 letters in translation)

6. Darwin, Erasmus (1st tranche: 2 letters of some 460)

7. Johnson, Doctor Samuel (1 letter)

8. Home, Henry, Lord Kames (1 letter)

9. O’Bryen, Rear-admiral Edward (1 letter)

10. Scurlock, Reverend David (1 letter)

II. Biographical Dictionary (approx. 100 people)

This year’s update adds a range of interesting people, here arranged chronologically by birth. Some of those listed here have had their collection of correspondence expanded, while the rest are new to the collection. As always, everyone is subject to further research, and of course we welcome edits and updates from our user community:

1630s

1680s

1690s

1700s

1710s

1720s

1730s

1740s

1750s

1760s

1770s

1780s

1790s

1800s

1810s

1820s

1830s

1840s

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